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2010 Grant Awards


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2010 Grant Awards | Archive

2010 Grant Awards

ACRJ

$22,000 toward the SAFIRE program, which combines outdoor experiences, ecological awareness, and practices relevant to the ancestral cultures of participants to ignite environmental stewardship and activism of young Asian women from low-income immigrant and refugee families in the Bay Area.

Adventure Risk Challenge
$30,000 to provide challenging wilderness retreats in Yosemite National Park, in-school academic support, and community-wide civic engagement for English Language Learners and their families. ARC builds achievement, connection, and potential for the underserved rural youth of Dos Palos in Merced County. The program links wilderness to academics, adventure to leadership, environmental science to literacy and confidence to activism.

Aim High for High School

$25,000 to support the Headlands Environmental Home program, which  provides urban youth with a deep understanding of environmental stewardship and responsibility through experiencing the interconnectedness of native species and the impact of human activities in the Marin Headlands.

Bay Area Wilderness Training (BAWT)

$30,000 for opportunities for at-risk and underprivileged youth to experience the transformative power of wilderness first hand. Through BAWT’s Front country Leadership Training Program youth providers will receive wilderness skills training, access to a free outdoor equipment library and tangible support to teachers. The teachers in turn engage the youth they work with in powerful outdoor educational experiences both through day hikes and overnight camping excursions.

Boys & Girls Clubs of Fresno County

$25,000 to support the Youth SOAR (Stewardship with Outdoor Adventures and Responsibility) program. Youth leaders will develop life skills and confidence, lead after-school programs for younger children, and guide stewardship projects in urban and wilderness sites. The project will empower youth, enhancing their strengths in goal-setting, appreciation for the nearby river and national parks, and commitment to community service.

Central California Consortium, program of the US Forest Service

$35,000 towards the Generation Green Youth Stewardship Program to select 14 diverse youth from urban and rural areas to complete summer stewardship internships (320 hours), where the youth work to improve public lands, are exposed to natural resource careers and gain valuable work experience.

City of East Palo Alto

$200,000 for their Cooley Landing Park Project Cooley Landing where local partners will run children and youth programs including nature and history education; music, poetry, and arts; and job training. This project will increase park space in East Palo Alto from 16 (0.5 acres per 1000 residents) to 25 acres. Cooley Landing Park will be East Palo Alto's first naturalistic and first bayfront park, a unique character compared to existing local urban parks.

City of Fort Bragg

$154,618 for their Fort Bragg Community Skate Park the City of Fort Bragg, in partnership with Mendocino Coast Recreation & Park District (MCRPD). The Community Skate Park will provide a safe and an appropriate venue for youth of Fort Bragg.

City of Santa Rosa

$189,000 for their Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens- Nature Play Area and Trails to create a nature-based, play area along with an access trail between Funston Ave and West Ave, a future safe route to school. The creation of a path and play area will provide an accessible and safe place for children to play and connect with their environment.

CommunityGrows

$10,000 to support the BEETS (Band of Environmentally Educated and Employed Teens-formerly the BEET Rangers) program that inspires and educates teens to be environmentally engaged and to develop practical and personal skills to become environmental leaders and future green collar workers.

Dolores C. Huerta Foundation

$30,000 towards the Youth Advocates Forging Unity on the Environment, Recreation, and Accountability (Youth AFUERA) program to engage young people of color in Southern Kern County in opportunities to participate in a series of outdoor recreation experiences designed to teach environmental awareness and develop leadership skills.

Downtown High School Get Out and Learn

$10,000 to support Get Out and Learn’s (GO&L) cornerstone ten-day wilderness expedition. GOAL is a year-round self-contained classroom, providing consistent teacher involvement coupled with greater student accountability, both academically and personally.

East Oakland Boxing Association (EOBA)

$30,000 towards "I am HECKA Strong" project to support the development and expansion of EOBA’s on-site garden and outdoor program. By integrating outdoor experiential learning, arts, academics, healthy lifestyle education, employment and raising community awareness, youth develop a meaningful awareness of the long-term connections between themselves, their families and community, their future possibilities, and the natural world around them.

Environmental Traveling Companions

$30,000 toward the Youth LEAD Program, which provides intensive outdoor leadership opportunities for economically disadvantaged and disabled youth. Participants will engage in summer outdoor leadership courses that follow a watershed from the sea to the mountains. Youth experience sea kayaking, whitewater rafting, backpacking, an organic farm stay, and the opportunity to participate in an eight-month Fellowship Program to further develop their leadership, outdoor, and job-readiness skills.

Escuela Popular

$8,000 to support Escuela Popular's outdoor program Natural High to affect a large number of different types of youth, to develop an awareness of the importance of our natural world by using the outdoors as a laboratory for academic and career studies, improve physical and mental health, reduce substance abuse, increase self confidence, promote wilderness programs as a viable alternative to youth, introduce the concept of a natural high, and introduce outdoor activities that may become a lifetime interest.

Feather River Land Trust

$90,275 for their Learning Landscapes project, a regional collaboration in the Upper Feather River Watershed to identify, conserve, improve and support access to natural areas within a 10 minute walk of every classroom for education and stewardship. This project will enhance the on-school and off-school infrastructure of nine Learning Landscape outdoor classrooms in four regional communities.

Global Exchange

$20,000 towards the Earthseed Outdoor Environmental Education program that promotes leadership and commitment to environmental stewardship among San Francisco's underserved youth through outdoor environmental education experiences. Through this program San Francisco youth will experience the outdoors, but also will have the opportunities to bring learning from outdoor day and overnight trips back to their families and communities.

$75,000 for Finding Urban Nature (FUN) Guide: Train the Trainers Initiative to encourage middle and high school students to engage in outdoor recreation and environmental learning at the San Francisco's seven unique urban watersheds and "nature in your neighborhood." The Fun Guide: Train the Trainers project will help counteract the physical, economic and cultural barriers many urban youth experience. 

Growing Up Wild

$9,000 to support hands-on outdoor educational experiences in the wilderness to two small groups of underserved Hispanic teenage boys, to promote lasting positive youth development in areas of personal growth, social skills, and environmental stewardship.

Movimiento

$10,000 to support Rural-Urban Youth Environmental Leadership, in which underserved youth from the Bay Area and Nevada County work together to learn about watershed, food/farming, and socio-environmental issues through wilderness excursions, indigenous youth Initiatives, land & crafts workshops, and conferences. Urban and rural youth spend time in each other's home communities, to exchange experiences and strategies for environmental and social change.

Native Alliance of the Sierra Nevada Foothills

$12,000 to support the Sierra Native Alliance (SNA) Youth Conservation Internship program that engages low-income youth in Placer and Nevada counties to restore an abandoned environmental education center on a historic Nisenan Maidu site in Auburn. Youth will learn environmental preservation skills from an indigenous perspective, and take the lead in developing a peer environmental education curriculum for ongoing use at the SNA Cultural Education Center.

Native American Health Center Inc

$30,000 towards the Chae-Mal Wilderness program that provides outdoor educational activities, including kayaking, white water rafting, hiking, teepee building, camping, snowshoeing and skiing, to urban Native American youth and underserved youth who reside in Oakland and the surrounding San Francisco Bay Area. Each activity demonstrates tribal roles in the development of each practice. This program revives and nurtures youth's cultural connection with the land and encourages their holistic development into adulthood.

North Roseville Recreational Center

$9,000 to enrich lives, develop physical, mental and social capabilities of youth by connecting them to the outdoors, encouraging physical exercise, healthy eating and prevent childhood obesity in Sacramento area.

One Cool Earth

$8,000 to establish a student-operated California native plant nursery at Liberty High School that will connect with campus restoration efforts, provide green jobs training, and offer a gateway of experience and knowledge through which youth can better understand the natural environment and enter into environmentally-related professions.

Phat Beets Produce

$10,000 to support the Healthy Hearts Market Garden which will educate teens affected by diet-related diseases about environmental stewardship, nutrition education, and healthy lifestyles choices through the use of organic gardening and green space creation. The HHMG program will engage over 150 teens in garden-based workshops and provide weekly trainings in garden creation, land stewardship, and nutrition education for teen stewards and peer educators from the Healthy Hearts Clinic.

Pogo Park

$200,000 for their involvement of the community residents to rebuild Elm Playlot located in the heart of the Iron Triangle neighborhood, home to over 5,000 children and young people. Elm Playlot will serves as a beautiful, safe, and engaging outdoor "commons," drawing residents out of their homes and into community with each other.

Pogo Park

$12,000 to support a grassroots, community-based organization to create a sustainable and replicable model that impacts how parks and playgrounds are designed, built, and operated in inner-city neighborhoods.

Seven Tepees Youth Program

$45,000 to support the “Get in the Water!” program, which will connect  100 disadvantaged youth to the outdoors through year-round environmental classes, 12 overnight trips, and student-led park beautification projects including explorations of California coasts and watersheds. Participants will also undertake a unique eight-week community service program that teaches job skills and environmental justice principles.

Soil Born Farms Urban Agriculture Project

$30,000 to support the Youth Corps program, which provides youth with a direct understanding of the connection between their personal health, healthy food, and the environment. Utilizing Soil Born Farms' property along the American River, the program provides hands-on experiences that focus on environmental stewardship, organic farming, habitat restoration, exploration of the natural environment, outdoor trips, healthy cooking, and community service projects.

Synergia

$10,000 to support the Finding the Good traveling semester (16 weeks) for high school students to practice and promote sustainability in the areas of shelter, transportation, energy, food, culture, and environmental conservation. While traveling throughout California, students study and document working models of sustainability. Following their semester students become the educators, bringing their knowledge back to their schools and communities by giving peer-to-peer presentations and leading sustainability initiatives.

The Trust for Public Land

$200,000 for the Boedekker Park and Clubhouse in the Tenderloin, San Francisco's most dense and diverse neighborhood. The Trust for Public Land, in partnership with the City of San Francisco, will rebuild the playground and clubhouse according to an extensive community-driven design plan, making it a more accessible and welcoming place for children and youth to play, gather, and connect with the outdoors.

The Yosemite Foundation

$25,000 towards the Yosemite Fund's Youth in Yosemite program, where more than 40 youth will engage in an 8-week immersion experience in Yosemite including field work with park managers on projects that offer unique opportunities to learn more about natural and cultural sciences, geology, habitat restoration and trail engineering.

Tuolumne River Preservation Trust

$20,000 towards the Stanislaus County Youth Ambassador Program to engage 80 youth in exploring the outdoor opportunities in their own county, from hiking and camping to canoeing, fishing and geocaching. Through different lessons, day trips, and overnights, youth will be immersed in the natural, cultural, and historic richness of their county, instilling community pride and the capacity to take advantage of local resources to make the outdoors a more integral part of their lives.

Valley of the Moon Teen Center

$10,000 to help VOMTC, in collaboration with the Sonoma Ecology Center, combat the 'nature deficit disorder' by providing youth with opportunities for learning and growth through the exploration of their local environment. "Outdoors to Excellence" will include four field experiences in Sonoma County, one overnight trip to the coast, a kayaking trip, and 12 mountain bike trips with up to 15 teens on each trip.

Watsonville Wetlands Watch

$30,000 towards Pajaro Valley High School Project-based Outdoor Learning program that empowers Watsonville teens to be citizen scientists to collect and analyze environmental data as they develop a personal connection to the unique wetlands in their community. Working side by side with scientists, docents, and peer mentors, teens explore the great outdoors, develop their own wetland projects, and get introduced to green careers. They also become empowered to assume leadership roles to mentor other youth in outdoor wetland activities.

Wilderness Arts and Literacy Collaborative

$12,000 to support a field-based study program that teaches core environmental education concepts while integrating WALC's rigorous academic curriculum. This curriculum is composed of seven camping trips, four hiking trips, and weekly habitat restoration for the Balboa High School chapter and four camping trips, 24 hiking trips, and a weekly habitat restoration for the downtown High School chapter.

WildLink, a Program of NatureBridge

$20,000 towards WildLink program that serves underderserved youth through a series of wilderness and community-based outdoor programs offered at no charge. Using a robust partnership network, WildLink educates, inspires and empowers youth to become long-term environmental stewards with strong connections to the natural world in both the wilderness and their communities.

WildPlaces

$10,000 to support WildPlaces which teams underserved youth with talented outdoor educators, activists, biologists, teachers, U.S. Forest Service personnel, archeologists, peer counselors, and artists for trips in the Sequoia National Forest and Giant Sequoia National Monument. Youth from Lamont, Bakersfield, and Sacramento will experience hands-on habitat restoration, camping, backpacking, rock-climbing, site protection, restoration, community building, environmental stewardship and activism. 

Yosemite National Park

$56,500 for their Break Down Cultural Barriers initiative, by aligning program curriculum with the needs and concerns of the Central Valley communities, this initiative will help break down cultural and socio-economic barriers that people of diverse backgrounds face to connect to great outdoors. Yosemite National Park system will harness the community's skills, talents, ideas, and assets, engage in meaningful dialogue, and build relationships so that culturally relevant ideology and collaboration will inform our program curriculum development.

Youth Enrichment Strategies

$20,000 toward the Camp to Community program, which utilizes positive youth development practices to empower teens towards developing leadership skills to help their community. YES addresses community conflict, resource disparity in accessing positive youth development activities, and the need for community connection in Richmond. Supported by YES staff, Camp to Community youth will lead overnight Summer Camps, Family Camps and Day Outings.

Grant Awards Archive

2006 Grant Awards

2007 Grant Awards

2008 Grant Awards

2009 Grant Awards

2010 Grant Awards

2011 Grant Awards


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