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2011 Grant Awards


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2011 Grant Awards | Archive

2011 Grant Awards

Adventure Risk Challenge

$30,000 for the Building Bridges program which will expose youth to the wilderness and engage youth in multiple outdoor experiences to create a lasting connection to the outdoors. This is an exceptional leadership opportunity for the under-resourced high school youth of the Central Valley. This program is an innovative, year-round outdoor program that engages UC Merced students as mentors, tutors, and instructors.

Alliance Equine Rescue and Youth Educational Foundation

$10,000 to promote positive youth development by providing year-round, experiential outdoor learning activities utilizing horses to engage underserved and at-risk youth participants in their own life improvement process in San Luis Obispo County.

ARISE High School

$20,000 for its Beyond the Classroom project. This program is a cultural immersion experience, which requires students to live away from home in an environment that is foreign to them; these classes include camping, biking, hiking, and even snowboarding; hands-on biology and ecology classes for which students explore local creeks and trails; freshman and sophomore kayaking physical education programs; weekly advisory outdoor days; extended day program during which students garden, learn circus arts and bike; to overnight college retreats which have included adventure-based teambuilding initiatives, ARISE students have experienced the natural world outside the confines of ARISE in numerous ways.

Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice (Bay Area)

$20,000 for SAFIRE Rising ignites practical environmental stewardship among young Asian women from low-income immigrant and refugee families in urban Oakland through a series of retreats at a teaching farm/ecology center, combining hands-on outdoor experiences with culturally relevant ecological practices to apply in their daily lives back home in the city. SAFIRE Rising, piloted successfully in 2010, is now a regular and ongoing component of SAFIRE's year-round program of youth development and community environmental activism for these young women.

Bay Area Outreach and Recreation Program

$20,000 for the Outdoor Adventures for Youth with Disabilities program, which intends to increase the self-confidence, self-perception, and independence of 65 youth with physical disabilities and visual impairments by taking them out of the city and into nature. The program exposes youth to a range of outdoor activities and environments, showing them how to overcome obstacles, encouraging them to see obstacles as opportunities rather than as barriers, and providing them with hands-on, multi-sensory environmental education--all to encourage their future outdoor exploration.

Bay Area Wilderness Training

$30,000. Bay Area Wilderness Training (BAWT) empowers teachers and youth workers to integrate outdoor and environmental education curriculum into their programs. Through low-cost wilderness leadership courses, free gear lending libraries, and financial and logistical support, these leaders are given the confidence, equipment, and tools to bring youth into the outdoors and provide enriched learning experiences. BAWT’s network of trained leaders, working in underserved communities throughout the Bay Area, reaches over 7,000 youth per year. As the network grows, a culture of outdoor and environmental educational values is spreading to new communities.

Boys and Girls Club of Fresno County

$20,000 for the A.C.C.E.S.S. for Youth Project (Adventures Connecting Career Education and Sparking Stewardship) which will inspire 40 at-risk youth to seek career opportunities in the outdoor and recreation industries. While engaged in adventured based learning youth will develop positive life skills that will help them break the cycle of poverty and risky behaviors. ACCESS will open their eyes to the magnificence of the natural environment and create a vision for them for employment in the future.

Boys and Girls Club of San Francisco

$25,000 Boys & Girls Clubs of San Francisco (BGCSF) believes all youth have the right to experience and enjoy nature and the outdoors as a fundamental part of a healthy lifestyle. BGCSF owns and operates Camp Mendocino, a place for urban youth to explore the wonders of the natural world in a Coastal Redwood forest that is completely "off the grid". Our Leaders in Training Program (LIT) is an important avenue to engage low income teens at Camp. By combining an introduction of environmental and natural science concepts, promoting environmental stewardship, and mentoring younger age youth the LIT's ultimately build leadership skills.

$193,000 for the Milagro Park project which will provide much needed open space that will model a "green" community park, serve as a community eco-learning center, highlight innovative play areas and provide gathering space (micro-amphitheater) for instruction, celebrations and social gatherings. The community garden, in collaboration with other community initiatives, will promote health and nutrition in a culturally sensitive manner. Milagro Park will, by design and the physical infrastructure, serve as the "heart of the community".

California Community Partners for Youth

$20,000 for its Step-Up/Ahead Outdoor Education to change life directions. The program takes inner city youth out of their city neighborhood and into nature trust and teamwork are developed and deepened as the foundation for the in-school/in-city components.

California State Parks Foundation

$30,000 for the Outdoor Youth Connection Program. Outdoor Youth Connection (OYC) connects youth with nature by making resources, access and information easily attainable for California's most disadvantaged youth. By providing highly structured introductions to outdoor experiences in a way that helps overcome barriers of poverty, lack of transportation, and fear, OYC empowers youth to use what they learn along with all the benefits of an outdoor experience as a tool to address issues within their daily lives and communities.

Chabot Space and Science Center

$200,000 for The Redwoods which will be an outdoor, overnight environmental education center located in the hilltop East Bay Regional Park (EBRP) land adjacent to Chabot Space & Science Center in Oakland, California. Programming will focus on hands-on, overnight activities and education about the East Bay Regional Parks’ unique natural resource - the redwood forest - within which the site's 9 cabins will be situated.

City of Kerman Parks and Recreation Department

$200,000. The City of Kerman is partnering with Kerman Unified School District, KaBOOM!, and Tree Fresno to develop a park using the "NatureGrounds" design system. NatureGrounds creates parks that integrate manufactured infrastructure with living landscape. This project will connect nature and residents, helping to create a more vibrant community. Kerman has significant financial support from local and regional businesses, and enthusiastic community support, furthering our goal of providing parks within walking distance for our residents.

Community Grows

$8,000 for the BEETS program which offers 4-month internships to youth throughout the year. There are 3 internship cycles with a minimum of 6 and a maximum of 8 youth in each session. BEETS interns earn an hourly stipend of $9.00 an hour and work a minimum of one afternoon a week and a maximum of three, as well as one Saturday per month. Youth also have the opportunity to participate in a variety of optional activities, including taking on extra assistant teaching classes, more weekend workdays and conferences, and/or the creation of their own garden projects. A crucial part of the BEETS curriculum is hands-on experiences in the field of green jobs. Participants learn a range of new skills, including: basic horticulture and garden maintenance; healthy cooking and harvesting; and pro-active environmental leadership.

Downtown High School Get Out and Learn

$14,000 for its Get Out and Learn Wilderness Expedition project. The Catalyst Grant will fund GOAL's cornerstone ten-day wilderness expedition each semester, fall and spring for up to thirty eight students per semester.

East Bay Asian Youth Center

$200,000. The Oakland Schoolyard Initiative (OSI) seeks to transform two large, hazardous, and grossly under-utilized asphalt schoolyards at Sankofa Academy in North Oakland and Sobrante Park Elementary School in East Oakland into safe, accessible, and usable outdoor playgrounds for children, youth, and families.

Girls Inc. of Alameda County

$20,000 for its Eureka! Teen Achievement Program, a five year youth development program designed to inspire girls from under-performing schools to persist and pursue post-secondary education and careers in the environment, science, technology, engineering and math. Through the Eureka! girls explore the environment, take positive risks, learn, practice and apply new skills, and build their self-confidence through hands-on, minds-on exposure and activities in outdoor spaces around them in their own community and throughout the Greater Bay Area.

Golden Gate Parks Conservancy

$25,000. The proposed project will broaden the impact of their most dynamic high school youth leadership and stewardship programs (WISE, I-YEL and LINC), including appropriate adjustments and refinements in concert with a strategic program planning process. The overall intent and purpose of these programs is to develop the next generation of diverse environmental and community leaders by integrating meaningful outdoor experiences into the lives of traditionally underserved urban youth, with a particular emphasis on engaging communities of color and economically disadvantaged young people.

Growing Up Wild

$13,000 for The Boys in the Woodz Program, a coming-of-age program that provides groups of underserved teen boys with educational experiences in the wilderness. Groups engage in four weekends of hands-on outdoor activities that foster life skills, health and fitness, and nature education.

Kids in Parks

$15,000 in support of multiple environmental education programs. Students will participate in weekly or bi-weekly classroom and field sessions, studying the many ecological resources in their communities and caring for those resources through service learning. In the process, students will gain vocational skills that translate into real-world careers--helping them connect to their communities and empowering them to succeed in the workforce.

Mid Klamath Watershed Council

$18,000 for the Outdoor Park and Educational Facility Project which is an outdoor learning, meeting and performance space located on a riverside lot along the Klamath River in Orleans, California. This project will consist of a covered outdoor stage and tiered outdoor seating for about 100 people. The site will be carefully graded to preserve the natural setting and will be landscaped with native plants. Electrical service will be installed at the stage for lighting and Audio/Visual equipment. Interpretive sign displays on local ecology will be installed.

Movimiento

$12,000 for their Youth Environmental Leadership program, in which underserved youth from the Bay Area and Nevada County work together to learn about food/farming, watersheds, and cultural and socio-environmental issues through wilderness excursions, farming, indigenous youth initiatives, and outdoor mental health. Urban and rural youth spend time in each other's home communities, exchanging experiences and learning strategies for environmental, personal, and social change.

Native Alliance of the Sierra Nevada Foothills

$25,000 for The Native Youth Conservation Project (NYCP) designed to support the social, cultural, economic and environmental engagement needs of Native American youth in the Sierra Nevada Foothills by facilitating a year-long environmental internship program. Twelve youth interns will be trained in environmental education, restoration, advocacy, and media skills; and will form a leadership group to produce peer-education materials, and facilitate outdoor education experiences for an additional 150 youth during the project year.

Native American Health Center

$30,000 for its Chae-Mal Wilderness program, which is dedicated to connecting American Indian and other underserved youth who reside in the San Francisco Bay Area to the outdoors while strengthening their cultural knowledge of American Indian traditional practices associated specifically with educational and recreational activities. These activities will introduce, revive and nurture youths' cultural connections with the land and environment, and support their holistic development into adulthood.

Native Springs Foundation

$10,000 for the Environmental Ambassador Program. This program is a unique youth-led, grassroots outdoor program designed to enable Native and non-Native youth to acquire environmental knowledge and skills, and to apply these to real-world problems, not only to improve our local and regional environment, but to build capacity for future success through development of personal, academic, and professional skills.

NatureBridge

$20,000 for its WildLink program, which transforms underserved youth through a series of powerful outdoor experiences offered at no cost in wilderness and local communities. WildLink educates, inspires, and empowers youth to become environmental stewards with lifelong connections to the natural world in the wilderness and at home.

New Leaf: A Sustainable Living Collaborative

$25,000 for the New Leaf Collaborative Impact Project. This project uses alternative education to enhance outdoor appreciation and outdoor career-focused skills development. Students are mentored by a variety of community members, teach concepts to other students, improve school yard habitats, and assist professional scientists. In addition there are internships related to outdoor careers such as: wildlife biology, park rangers, landscape maintenance, cultural landscape engineering, arborists, muralists, and water quality specialists.

$11,000 to expand and provide programs and activities that include, camping, nature museum, lakes, pools and parks, interacting with wild life, learning how to protect lakes, forests and wildlife, hiking trips, kayaking, snow trips, Gardening, etc. Outreach will connect with more youth and give them more tools to overcome barriers.

Planting Justice

$7,500 for the Using our Food Justice and Culinary Arts curriculum. Planting Justice leads a weekly training program at Mandela High School giving 25 at-risk youth the opportunity to engage in sustainable practices of urban agriculture that promote community health, re-connect students to nature through food, and expand access to fresh produce in this under-served urban community. While building a garden on their school campus, students are trained to maintain vegetable beds and fruit trees, cook from the garden, develop a garden-to-market program, preserve traditional foods, recipes, and heirloom varieties, and explore local, national, and international food issues to become young leaders in the food and climate justice movements.

Project Avary

$20,000 for its Outdoor Leaders Training Project. This program builds a pool of young outdoor leaders by providing a variety of graduated training opportunities and experiences. The program begins by exposing youth to the outdoors over a period of years, to build confidence, wilderness skills, and a life-affirming vision among at-risk youth. Individualized training plans assure youth are able to develop skills in areas of their own personal interests and aptitudes. The project culminates by connecting trained youth graduates with real employment experience both at Project Avary and with partner organizations.

PUEBLO

$11,500 to integrate day-long trips to regional parks/farms, and urban park stewardship activities, into their during-school academic program, after-school leadership development programs, and summer job training program. 10-12th grade classes in our partner schools will learn about Bay Area ecosystems and organic farms through first-hand experience, and then apply this knowledge to improve neglected parks in East Oakland by installing school/community gardens, restoring native ecosystems, and leading outdoor education/interpretive programs.

Real Options for City Kids

$20,000. ROCK strives to break the cycle of poverty and violence in Visitacion Valley. Through a combination of outdoor adventures, community service and leadership training, and by implementing best youth development practices, the organization has the unique ability to empower its participants with the tools and experiences necessary to become successful, productive adults.

$7,500 to involve 90 historically under-served Latino and Hmong youth in a yearlong exploration and experience of the San Joaquin River. Youth will participate in a series of on-the water activities including skill training, interpretive river trips, river cleanup events, and a celebration race. Youth will learn of the effort to restore Chinook salmon to the river, the need for stewardship, and make culturally appropriate presentations to their communities.

Sonoma Valley Teen Services

$12,000 for the Outdoors to Excellence program. The purpose of Outdoors to Excellence is to continue to inspire our youth through education and hands-on experience with the natural environment. At the end of their trips, the teens are happier, more social and open to new experiences, and enthusiastic to plan their next field trip. The Outdoors to Excellence program we will provide them with opportunities to learn and grow through the exploration of their local environment. Outdoors to Excellence includes: one two night camping trip, four field trip experiences in Sonoma County, and 12 mountain bike trips. And 15 teens will participate in the Open Space Preserve Patrol.

Sunrise Middle School

$11,000 for the Sunrise Middle School (SMS) Outdoor Program, which exposes underserved 7th and 8th grade youth to outdoor experiences like caving, rafting, high ropes, horseback riding, as well as to activities designed to give them reflective time in nature - e.g., backpacking, hiking, and sit-alones. Also, the school has "adopted" a creek near the campus and will be in charge of keeping it clean.

Urban Promise Academy

$20,000 for the Wilderness Independence and Leadership Development Program, which enables all 315 of UPA's students to experience over-night and day-long outdoor expeditions, and to participate in community-building conservation efforts at their school and around the Bay Area. These outdoor experiences will deepen students' relationships with teachers, friends and family, build a connection to nature, and reinforce the social, emotional and life effectiveness skills imparted by their academic environment.

$35,000 for the Homegrown Experts program which engages 30 young people age 14-18 in a 6-week summer apprenticeship that connects farms, food, and low-income urban youth. Led by five young adult Crew Leaders and three 18-year old Crew Seconds (all of whom are program graduates), and using a culturally competent youth-development model, the Program offers 100 hours of paid, hands-on urban agricultural education, vocational training, community service, and employment. Apprentices develop transferable skills by planting and cultivating community farms and gardens to serve the "food desert." Apprentices also spend two weekends working (and camping) on organic local farms owned by farmers of color.

Wildplaces

$14,000. WildPlaces protects, restores, and serves the wild and rural places in the southern Sierra and the youth and adult communities within the San Joaquin Valley by designing, planning and implementing volunteer-driven habitat restoration, leadership, youth development and gang prevention projects. Since 2001, they have provided many valuable and effective projects to educate and empower youth regarding watershed protection, youth leadership, empowerment, and direct action to create a more sustainable and equitable future for all. Their programs serve youth within the San Joaquin Valley regions and increase the participation of under-served youth in meaningful outdoor programs that include meadow restorations, river stewardship, giant sequoia plantings, native plant nursery development, willow restoration, art, and rangeland preservation.

$20,000 for its Camp-to-Community (C2C) program that utilizes positive youth development practices to empower teens in developing leadership skills and translates these skills to the community and world of work. Supported by YES staff, C2C youth serve as leaders through Counselor-in-Training positions at summer camp, mentor and lead in YES' Family Camp and Day Outing programs; and intern at local "green" agencies.

Youth for Change

$25,000. Using an experiential education format, Youth for Change will collaborate with a range of agencies to implement a new wilderness program for youth, ages 13-18, referred from Butte County Child Welfare Services and the Southside Oroville African American Family and Cultural Center. The intense, 9-month program of learning and wilderness activities will provide culturally diverse youth, having little or no outdoor experience, the opportunity to learn about self, others, and the environment.

Grant Awards Archive

2006 Grant Awards

2007 Grant Awards

2008 Grant Awards

2009 Grant Awards

2010 Grant Awards

2011 Grant Awards


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